A Die Study of James I Shillings – Third Issue, Sixth Bust, mm Trefoil – Gary Oddie

The three previous notes in this series have presented die studies for the third issue shillings with mintmarks Rose, Thistle and Lis. This note will finish off the third issue with a die study of the shillings with a trefoil mintmark. A total of 63 specimens have been noted from 36 obverse and 47 reverse dies and a statistical analysis suggests that as many again are yet to be discovered.  As the last mintmark of the reign, the trefoil continued to be used for a few months into the reign of Charles I and two Pyx trails were carried out on 7 July 1625, the first for coins struck whilst James I was alive and the second for posthumous issues. This note also identifies a group of dies that might be associated with the posthumous issues.  Extrapolating from the Rose, Thistle and Trefoil data allows an estimate to be made of the amount of silver at the previous Trial of the

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A Die Study of James I Shillings – Third Issue, Sixth Bust, mm Thistle – Gary Oddie

This note presents the next die study of the third issue James I shillings. Once again online archives and private collectors are thanked for their images. Just seven die-pair duplicates have been found amongst the 37 specimens and 23 obverse and 27 reverse dies have been identified. There are just two obverse legend variations (HI and HIB) and only one of these (HIB) is found with the plume reverse. The relatively small number of die duplicates in the sample suggests that there will likely be over 50 obverse dies and more than 80 reverse dies to be found. ……… or click here for the previous article in this series (A Die Study of James I Shillings – Third Issue, Sixth Bust, mm Lis)

A Die Study of James I Shillings – Third Issue, Sixth Bust, mm Lis – Gary Oddie

This is one of the commoner issues of James I shillings, though most private and institutional collections have at most a few specimens arranged by the types first noted by Hawkins in 1841 – Plain reverse, plumes reverse, maybe a contracted IACOB legend and the other abbreviations in MAG BRIT FRA and HIB.   This note presents a die study of these shillings showing the potential for mining on-line auction catalogue archives, for which Noonans (formerly Dix Noonan Webb), London Coins and Noble Numismatics (Australia) are thanked. Images of 84 specimens have been found and have revealed 50 different obverse dies and 63 reverse dies. The relatively small number of die duplicates in the sample suggests that there will be over 100 obverse dies and even more reverse dies to be found. Comparison with the previous note looking at mintmark Rose shillings (link) and the amount of silver presented at the respective Pyx trials suggests that it might be possible to

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Charles I Counterfeit Shillings – Connecting the York, Oxford and one of the Tower Types – Gary Oddie

A previous note presented a few contemporary counterfeit shillings of Charles I. (Link). These either displayed the EBOR mint signature or showed a declaration type similar to the official Oxford Issues. Punch links suggested connections between the different types. Recently the British Museum has photographed and uploaded its Charles I counterfeit shillings. This note presents eight of the BM pieces and fits them into the previous scheme and also adds a counterfeit Tower issue shilling mm tun. Punch links now allow all of the counterfeits described in the two notes to be divided into two groups suggesting just one or two workshops produced them all.

Revisiting an Enigmatic Charles I Pattern Shilling – Gary Oddie

In the British Museum trays is a coin that was initially considered to be a medal relating to the erection of the Royal Standard in 1642. This note presents in detail the contemporary references confirming that the piece is actually a pattern for a proposed debasement of the coinage in late July and early August 1640. One reference describes the design in sufficient detail to leave no doubt about the attribution and dating. Though Mint buildings had been prepared for the production of a debased coinage, none were ever issued. For his part in the project the Earl of Strafford was found guilty of treason and executed on 12 May 1641.

A Die Study of James I Shillings – Third Issue, Sixth Bust, mm Rose – Gary Oddie

This note arose after finding a die sinker’s error in the legend of a James I, third issue shilling with mintmark rose. A simple method is presented to allow the identification of different dies followed by a die study of the shillings of this scarce mintmark. Eleven different obverse and eleven reverse dies have been found from 22 specimens. This is sufficient to allow a tentative estimate of the likely number of dies that might be found with a more extensive study. Details of further specimens will be gratefully received.

Letter Regarding the Countermarking of the Base Testoons of Edward VI at Bedford – 16th October 1560 – Gary Oddie

This note presents a previously un-noticed letter sent to the Mayor and Burgesses of Bedford, dated 16th October 1560, regarding the countermarking of the base testoons of Edward VI with a portcullis or greyhound. Following a brief introduction to the state of the coinage and the countermarking campaign around the country, the full document is reproduced, along with a transcription. The document confirms that the town of Bedford received just one each of the portcullis and greyhound punches.  The Bedford document is very similar to one known for the city of Wells, but has a missing sentence when compared to a draft dated 10th October 1560 in The National Archives.

Coins and Medallions of Lady Jane Grey – Gary Oddie

This note presents a brief review of the events leading up to the brief reign of Lady Jane Grey and the coins and medallions that have been made subsequently with her portrait. The pieces made and used in the 1986 Paramount film ‘Lady Jane’ are described, along with the various pieces created by the infamous coiner Edward Emery and finally some modern pieces issued as part of monarchs’ sets. Though she was never crowned, the paranumismatic items form an interesting group.